24 07 19

first_img Boxcloud content managementcontent management platformMarketing Technology NewsNEC CorporationNews Previous ArticleVoleo Sees 1700% Increase in New User Registration in First Two Weeks of Google’s Digital Strategy ProgramNext ArticleG2 Names Modus a Leader in Sales Enablement Tools Box Powers NEC Corporation’s Digital Transformation with Cloud Content Management Business WireJuly 10, 2019, 3:03 pmJuly 10, 2019 Box Inc., a leader in cloud content management, announced that NEC Corporation (NEC) has chosen Box as its content management platform to support its “Work-Style Reform,” which is central to NEC’s digital business initiative.@Box Powers NEC Corporation’s Digital Transformation with Cloud Content ManagementNEC is a global company with operations in nearly 170 countries. NEC has deployed Box to over 100,000 employees within the worldwide NEC Group.Aiming to achieve continuous growth, NEC founded its “Mid-term Management Plan 2020” and established a digital business program. With advanced ICT, such as AI, data utilization, and digitalization of business processes and work-styles, the company will promote digital transformation.Marketing Technology News: Norled Sets Sail for Digital Transformation with InforNEC has selected Box’s platform to be central to its “Work-Style Reform” initiative, with a particular emphasis on the platform’s:unique sharing capabilities,robust security,simple and easy-to-use experience for system administrators,collaboration across internal and external organizations,access to a single source of truth, andintegration with multiple cloud services.With Box, NEC aims to increase employee engagement, and fundamentally change when and where employees can work, leading to new work-styles, enhanced business performance, and overall productivity improvement.Marketing Technology News: SeQuel Response Hires New Director of Marketing to Propel Brand AwarenessBox is a leading Cloud Content Management platform that enables organizations to accelerate business processes, power workplace collaboration and protect their most valuable information, all while working with a best-of-breed enterprise IT stack. Founded in 2005, Box works with 70 percent of the Fortune 500, including AstraZeneca, General Electric, JLL, and Nationwide, to drive business outcomes. Box is headquartered in Redwood City, CA, with offices across the United States, Europe and Asia.Marketing Technology News: Community Management Is the Main Course for Hospitality Sectorlast_img read more

19 07 19

first_img Source:https://www.intactvascular.com/ Reviewed by Alina Shrourou, B.Sc. (Editor)Oct 8 2018Intact Vascular, Inc., a developer of medical devices for minimally invasive peripheral vascular procedures, today announced that data from its Tack Optimized Balloon Angioplasty (TOBA) II pivotal clinical trial will be presented at the 15th Annual VIVA Conference in Las Vegas, NV on November 5-8.The TOBA II trial is the first-of-its-kind designed to investigate the safety and efficacy of the Tack Endovascular System® for the repair of post-angioplasty dissections in femoropopliteal arteries. The Tack Endovascular System, a dissection repair device that is pre-loaded with 6 self-expanding nitinol devices for above-the-knee (ATK) interventions, can be deployed to treat multiple dissections using a single catheter and leave behind >70% less metal than stents. Patients with peripheral arterial disease (PAD) who are treated with balloon angioplasty often suffer from dissections or tears in the artery wall. Dissections can result in acute thrombosis and occlusions if left untreated, and can lead to recurrent or worsening symptoms and repeat procedures.”The TOBA II data being presented at VIVA provide important clinical evidence regarding the therapeutic effectiveness of treating dissections with Tack® implants in a challenging patient population,” said Peter Schneider, MD, Vascular Surgeon at Kaiser Permanente in Honolulu, Hawaii, and Co-Founder and Chief Medical Officer of Intact Vascular. “Patients with peripheral arterial disease who are treated with balloon angioplasty and suffer dissections, or tears, in their artery wall are subject to increased risk of occlusions. We look forward to sharing the findings from the TOBA II trial, a first-of-its-kind pivotal trial studying the Tack Endovascular System in patients with 100% dissected vessels.”last_img read more

18 07 19

first_imgBy Lois Zoppi, BAFeb 22 2019Reviewed by Kate Anderton, B.Sc. (Editor)Scientists are moving closer to developing a new pacemaker that is powered by a person’s heartbeat.Current pacemakers need to be replaced every 5-12 years. (Picsfive | Shutterstock)Pacemakers are used to manage heart arrhythmia (irregular heartbeats). These conditions can either manifest as tachycardia (a rapid heartbeat exceeding the normal resting rate) or bradycardia (a resting heart rate of under 60 beats per minute). Arrhythmia can affect anyone of any age.The problems caused by arrhythmia are triggered by the heart being unable to pump blood around the body properly, with symptoms including fatigue, fainting, difficulty breathing, organ damage, and in extreme cases, untimely death.Pacemakers keep the heart beating at a regular rhythm by sending electrical pulses directly to the heart. They are made up of two parts: a pulse generator consisting of a battery and a small computer circuit, and pacing leads, which are wires that are attached to the heart.The pulse generator is usually implanted into a small pocket between the skin and the chest muscle below the collarbone, and the pacing leads are guided through a vein and into a chamber of the heart. The heartbeat is monitored by the pacemaker and regulated by electrical signals sent to the heart.Most pacemakers also have a sensor that detect both body motion and breathing rate, so signals can be sent to increase the heart rate during exercise.It’s estimated the 1.5 million Americans have pacemakers implanted, and according to a report published by the American Heart Association, heart disease remains the number one cause of death in the US.Despite their life-saving function, most pacemakers only last for five to twelve years. For instance, cardiac pacemakers powered by lithium iodine batteries have a lifespan of seven to 10 years.Invasive surgery is required each time the battery in the pacemaker needs replacing, incurring a risk of infection and bleeding during surgeries and steep financial costs each time the procedure is carried out.But researchers at the National Key Laboratory for Science and Technology in Shanghai, China, have developed a device that uses the power generated by the heart to run the pacemaker battery. This means that the battery would never have to be replaced, and countless invasive and complex surgeries could be avoided.Led by Hao Zhang, researchers developed a small, flexible, elastic skeleton bound to two piezoelectric composites, which could generate a high-output current of 15 μA in vivo.When bent, the piezoelectric layers generate energy, and when the device was implanted and tested on pigs, the researchers found that the movement of the heart could change the frame’s shape.Subsequently, they found that the new, heartbeat-powered pacemaker generated the same amount of power as a pacemaker powered by a battery.It is not the first time that scientists have tried to harness the mechanical power generated by heartbeats, with a Swiss team at the University of Bern taking inspiration from auto-winding wristwatches that wind when the user’s arm moves.However, researchers working on this particular innovation wish to make their device smaller and more efficient before it becomes a regular clinical option.The report states that the development is an “impressive step toward fabricating a self-powered or batteryless [sic] cardiac pacemaker”, and that it would “exempt the patients from surgical replacement, or at least, less frequently.” Source:Li, N., et al. 2019. Direct Powering a Real Cardiac Pacemaker by Natural Energy of a Heartbeat. ACS Nano.last_img read more

18 07 19

first_imgReviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Mar 12 2019New data, published in Nature Medicine, from scientists at the Technion, Stanford and CytoReason describes for the first time ever a way to reliably quantify a person’s “immune age”. This game changing capability provides a much more reliable predictor for the status of your immune system than any other method and could lead to fundamental changes in drug & vaccine development and medical practice.The immune system is the critical function in the body for managing health. It is a complex system with hundreds of different cell-types. Until now, no metric had existed to quantify an individual’s immune status. This ground-breaking new data, while requiring further development, describes a metric (called IMM-AGE) by which we can accurately understand a person’s immune status, providing increased information for accurate prediction and management of risks for disease and death.This new capability will have major drug development implications: Given the importance of immune status in vaccine response, this new data could play a significant role in both the design of future vaccine trials and in re-evaluating past vaccine trials. Moreover, this new metric for immune aging could see chronological age augmented by “immune age” as a way of improving drug development programs – providing for enhanced clinical trial entry/exclusion criteria that can elicit a more homogenous response and greater likelihood of success.”This paper represents a very important step towards developing useful measures of immunological health, helping to identify disease-related risk”, said Prof. Mark M. Davis, Head of the Stanford Institute for Immunity, Transplantation and Infection. “It’s been sixty years since the last immunological benchmarks (Complete Blood Counts) were introduced into general medical practice. This much more sophisticated method reflects the tremendous explosion of knowledge generated in the field.”Related StoriesNew shingles vaccine reduces outbreaks of painful rash among stem cell transplant patientsScripps CHAVD wins $129 million NIH grant to advance new HIV vaccine approachNanotechnology-based compound used to deliver hepatitis B vaccineThe researchers developed their unique data by following a group of healthy volunteers (135) for nine years, taking annual blood samples which were profiled against a range of ‘omics’ technologies (cell subset phenotyping, functional responses of cells to cytokine stimulations and whole blood gene expression). This captured population- and individual-level changes to the immune system over time, which when analyzed using a range of novel, immune aligned, machine learning analytical technologies, enabled identification of patterns of cell-subset changes, common to those in the study, despite the large amount of variation in their immune system states. The data and metrics generated was then validated against a cohort of more than 2,000 patients from the Framingham Heart Study”Starting in 2007, this study is really the birthplace of CytoReason – the beginning of the collection of the unique immune-focused data sets and the development of specific technologies to interrogate and transform these highly complex, multi-dimensional data into increased big-picture knowledge and clinically meaningful insights”, said Prof. Shen-Orr, Head of Systems Immunology & Precision Medicine lab at the Technion and Co-Founder and Chief Scientist at CytoReason. “The immune age is a biological clock that will help to identify in individuals, the decline and progress in immunity that occurs in old age – with the aim of determining preventive measures and developing new treatment modalities to minimize chronic disease and death.” Source:http://www.cytoreason.com/last_img read more

18 07 19

first_imgReviewed by Alina Shrourou, B.Sc. (Editor)May 13 2019In breast cancer, there are cases of women and men whose cancer returns in their bones 20-30 years after they were treated for their primary disease and thought they were cancer-free. This phenomenon always puzzled Jefferson researcher Karen Bussard, PhD. How is it possible that breast cancer cells from a primary tumor are able to reach the bones when a patient is deemed “cancer-free” after treatment? What was happening in bones that allowed the cancer cells to remain there for up to 30 years, alive but in a sleeping state, only to re-awaken decades later? In a step towards answering these questions, Dr. Bussard recently discovered a type of bone cell that can subdue cancer cells, slowing their growth, even in one of the most aggressive types of breast cancer: triple negative.The results, published in Breast Cancer Research, raise intriguing questions about how these bone cells exert their sleep-inducing influence, and whether it’s possible to replicate and permanently turn cancers dormant.”Cancer has this uncanny ability to turn other cell types it comes in contact with to the cancer cell’s advantage,” says Dr. Bussard, Assistant Professor of Cancer Biology at Thomas Jefferson University and a researcher at the Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center — Jefferson Health. “For example, cancer cells can turn the immune cells that should kill it, into its own guards. However, we have now found a population of bone cells that not only resists, but subdues the cancer. It’s fascinating.”Together with co-first authors and graduate students, Alexus D. Kolb and Alison B. Shupp and others, Dr. Bussard probed how bone cells change once they interact with breast cancer cells in the bone. Specifically, they looked at osteoblasts – a kind of bone cell that lays down new bone, like cement, during growth and repair.The research team showed that the osteoblast cells from mice as well as humans drastically changed their function after interacting with bone-metastatic breast cancer cells. Earlier studies had shown that in advanced stage bone-metastatic breast cancer patients, osteoblasts stopped working; failing to produce a matrix that stabilizes and strengthens bone. The changes lead to loss of bone density that is common in these patients. In her new work, Dr. Bussard and colleagues showed that in earlier stages of the disease, when cancer cells first enter the bone, rather than producing new bone, osteoblasts may divert their energy toward producing factors to halt cancer cell growth.Related StoriesBacteria in the birth canal linked to lower risk of ovarian cancerHow cell-free DNA can be targeted to prevent spread of tumorsSpecial blood test may predict relapse risk for breast cancer patientsWhen osteoblasts from humans or mice were exposed to triple negative or estrogen receptor positive breast cancer cells that had migrated to the bone, the osteoblasts released factors that changed cancer cell behavior. These factors were able to swing the balance away from limitless cancer cell growth, and toward restoring production of the cell-cycle checkpoint protein p21, which stops metastatic breast cancer cells from replicating endlessly. Dr. Bussard’s team showed that cancer growth slowed in the presence of osteoblasts that had come in contact with metastatic breast cancer cells. The osteoblasts that did not interact with metastatic breast cancer cells, on the other hand, were unable to slow cancer cell growth.”The bone-building osteoblast cells have a complex relationship with cancer,” says Dr. Bussard. “In advanced stages of the disease, we know that metastatic breast cancer cells can co-opt the normal cells of the bone to help cancer metastases thrive. However, our new work suggests that during early stages of the disease, such as when metastatic breast cancer cells first migrate to the bone, these cancer-exposed osteoblasts resist and fight cancer growth.””Understanding how breast cancer cells prosper through metastasis to bone has been a long held goal of the breast cancer research community. Dr. Bussard’s breakthrough discoveries pave the way toward developing new strategies to prevent or treat metastatic disease”, says Karen E. Knudsen, PhD, EVP of Oncology Services and Enterprise Director of the Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center — Jefferson Health.The next step, says Dr. Bussard, is to fully characterize the molecules that osteoblasts use to reign in cancer growth, and see whether it’s possible to turn that understanding toward treatments that can put cancer cells to sleep forever. Source:http://www.jefferson.edu/last_img read more

18 07 19

first_imgWe haven’t had this data on patterns of pediatric antibiotic use from the perspective of the AWaRe classification before and it’s an important first step in seeing what needs to be done globally.” Source:St George’s, University of London Although there aremany reasons why there are these variations, from a clinical perspective there is no justification for using such a wide variation of broad spectrum antibiotics – including’Watch’antibiotics such as azithromycin – to treat pneumonia in young children,,for example.”This measure will allow health authorities to identify areas of concern and is an important starting point in the simple stewardship interventions that are crucial on a national and global level.Since the WHO has now called for the 60% Access ambition, it is most important that we encourage improved access to Access antibiotics to treat infections in children globally if we are to tackle the problem of antibiotic resistance.” Reviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Jun 16 2019A new measure has identified for the first time whether the most suitable antibiotics are being used to treat newborns and children in hospital on a national basis.The measure will be a crucial tool in combating antimicrobial resistance worldwide, allowing countries to benchmark themselves both internally and internationally and highlighting where improvements can be made.The measure classifies all antibiotics according to the World Health Organisation’s Access, Watch and Reserve Index (AWaRe)’, which classifies antibiotics into three groups with the aim of improving access and facilitating appropriate prescribing. The three groups comprise: ‘Access’ which should be used as first choice for most infections; ‘Watch’ for use as a second choice, and to be used sparingly; and ‘Reserve’ for use as a last resort.The WHO has recently recommended that Access group antibiotics should account for at least 60% of every country’s total antibiotic use.To develop this new way to measure antibiotics, researchers at St George’s, University of London used two point prevalence surveys data- GARPEC and Global PPS -studying patterns of antibiotic use in 23,572children in 56 countries. The data included high income, upper middle income and low middle-income countries across 6 WHO regions. The data also provided insight into what antibiotics were typically used to treat common childhood conditions.Dr Yingfen Hsia of St George’s, who led the survey, said: Related StoriesNew network for children and youth with special health care needs seeks to improve systems of careNew therapeutic food boosts key growth-promoting gut microbes in malnourished childrenWhy Mattresses Could be a Health Threat to Sleeping ChildrenResearchers found wide variations in patterns of antibiotic use in hospitalized children using the AWaRe classification. In children’Access’antibiotic use ranged from 7.8% in China to61.2% in Slovenia; and’Watch’antibiotic use ranged from 23.0% in Finland to 77.3% in Iran. Prescribing standards for common childhood conditions such as neonatal sepsis and chest infections showed wide variation.There are many reasons for the variation of prescribing patterns between countries. These include the prevalence of infections caused by highly resistant bacteria; local healthcare service issues including infrastructure and staffing; and the pricing or affordability of antibiotics.Professor Mike Sharland of St George’s said:last_img read more

18 07 19

first_img Next Garima Abrol, wife of late IAF pilot Samir Abrol, may soon join armed forcesGarima Abrol, the wife of late IAF squadron leader Samir Abrol, has cleared the SSB and may soon join the armed forces.advertisement India Today Web Desk New DelhiJuly 16, 2019UPDATED: July 16, 2019 00:26 IST Samir and Garima Abrol. (Image: Facebook)Garima Abrol, the wife of late Indian Air Force (IAF) pilot Samir Abrol who died in a Mirage crash earlier this year, has cleared the Services Selection Board (SSB) in Varanasi and may soon be eligible to join the forces.According to ANI, Garima Abrol has cleared Services Selection Board from Varanasi and may get an opportunity to join IAF’s academy in Dundigal in Telangana.In February 2019, Squadron Leaders Samir Abrol and Siddartha Negi died when a Mirage 2000 trainer aircraft crashed in Bengaluru.In the days following the heartbreaking accident, Garimal Abrol wrote a moving post on social media slamming IAF authorities for using “outdated” equipment to risk the lives of its personnel.The two pilots were conducting an acceptance sortie of the Mirage-2000 trainer, which had been newly upgraded by state-run aerospace company Hindustan Aeronautics Limited, when it crashed on February 1.Though the pilots made a bid to eject, they were caught in the flames as the plane crashed with a huge explosion.HAL regretted the incident and expressed condolence to the family of the two pilots. Negi was a native of Dehradun in Uttarakhand while Abrol was from Ghaziabad, Uttar Pradesh.Also Read | It still hasn’t sunk in, writes wife of deceased IAF pilot in moving Facebook postAlso Read | IAF to send crashed Mirage 2000’s black box to France for further investigationAlso Watch | An-32’s black box recovered from crash site in Arunachal PradeshFor the latest World Cup news, live scores and fixtures for World Cup 2019, log on to indiatoday.in/sports. Like us on Facebook or follow us on Twitter for World Cup news, scores and updates.Get real-time alerts and all the news on your phone with the all-new India Today app. Download from Post your comment Do You Like This Story? Awesome! Now share the story Too bad. Tell us what you didn’t like in the comments Posted bySanchari Chatterjeelast_img read more