Alumna author returns to SMC for book reading, signing

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first_imgThis Monday, Saint Mary’s College is hosting alumna Mary Grace Foxwell, class of 2007, and her father Alan Guebert for a reading and signing of their recently released memoir, “The Land of Milk and Uncle Honey.”Guebert, a nationally syndicated agricultural columnist, co-authored the book with his daughter.“The Land of Milk and Uncle Honey” was recently included on Bon Appetit Magazine’s “20 New Food Books to Read This Summer,” Los Angeles Magazine’s “A Summer Reading List for Foodies” and Food Tank’s “2015 Summer Reading List.”The book is a collection of memories gathered from Guebert’s stories and reflections written for his weekly “Farm and Food File” column, which has run in the South Bend Tribune and 70 other newspapers for more than 20 years, Foxwell said.“[My father] started writing the column when I was just a young girl,” she said. “Most of the book’s characters had passed away long before I was born. Yet as long as I can remember, he’s told these stories of Indian Farm — not only to me and my brother, but also column readers from Maryland to Montana — and many of us have asked him to compile a memoir.“It wasn’t just me urging my father to take on a book project — many other folks were as well.”According to the Foxwell Digital website, Indian farm was a 720-acre, 100-cow dairy farm in Southern Illinois where Guebert grew up during the 1960s. The stories and memories related in “The Land of Milk and Uncle Honey” are products of the time Foxwell’s father spent on the farm.With a mutual respect for their unique gifts and abilities, the father-daughter team worked together to share numerous lesson-filled memories to readers outside their immediate family and the news column, Foxwell said.“I wanted the lessons he and I have learned from the hired men, my grandparents and my great-great-Uncle Honey to affect and inform others, and to possibly make people think about how rural communities have changed, what our small towns and farms are missing and how we can return the real ‘culture’ to agriculture someday,” Foxwell said.Foxwell combined all her various interests in food, cooking, writing, editing, reading and telling stories in an effort to write a memoir that will inspire conversations between communities, she said.“We need to talk about where our food comes from, who grows and packages it, how our rural communities and towns have changed, where we want our future food policies to be directed and how we want our global food system to look in another generation or two,” Foxwell said. “We also need to remember the simple lessons from Indian Farm: hard work, humility and caring for our community and for the land.“Publishing a memoir is one way to start that conversation, but there are countless other ways to share your voice with the world.”Foxwell, who majored in humanistic studies at Saint Mary’s, said she believes the major provided her with the self-confidence and skills required to take on the multifaceted project. She said humanistic studies deepened her love for reading and learning, both of which enabled her to complete the memoir with her father.“My father and I like to say that great writers are first and foremost great readers,” Foxwell said. “And I think that’s why we could both take on this project knowing the other person had a shared zeal and appreciation for the written word.”The event will take place Monday, Aug. 31, from 6 to 8 p.m. in Rice Commons in the student center. Copies will be available for purchase at the signing.Additional information, including future events and contact information, can be found at www.farmandfoodfile.com.Tags: author reading, food, St. Mary’s Collegelast_img read more

Dog Thrown From Moving Car Among Pets Up For Adoption on Long Island

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first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York From senior cats looking to spend the rest of their lives with that special someone, to young pups and kittens seeking forever families to grow with, can you open your heart and home to one of these deserving furry friends today?Join Last Hope Animal Rescue for a night of fun, music and food at their Rockin’ Rescue Night from 6:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. on Friday, Oct. 11 at the Levittown Hall, 201 Levittown Pkwy., Hicksville. Enjoy music by the band Vox Nova, a live auction and raffle baskets. The event is $25 per person in advance, or $30 at the door. Light dinner fare provided by Piccolo Ristorante in Bellmore. Savory sweets, soda, tea & coffee will also be served. For more information, visit lasthopeanimalrescue.orgAvailable for adoption at North Shore Animal League America:RingoPeace and love is all Ringo Starr (adoption #H190473) is asking for. Ringo has faced more adversity than any senior pet should ever face. Rescued locally from an unsafe living environment, the team at North Shore Animal League America has given this 13-year-old gentleman all the time he needs to nurture his broken spirit and learn to trust. Like any feline friend, Ringo enjoys lazing around by sunny windows and napping in cozy nooks, but he really comes to life when he’s offered treats. Ringo is seeking a quiet “retirement home” with a committed human who will continue to work with him to build his confidence.  Children 12+ in age will help him settle into his best. GizmoNo worries about giving this Gizmo water after midnight. Gizmo (adoption #V30813) is a 5-year-old, long-haired fella recently rescued from Virginia. He will thrive in a calm setting, with children 12 and up in age and adults who can nurture his spirit. He’ll be sure to make the perfect soulmate for someone very soon. Plus, look at that nose! It doesn’t get much cuter than this little guy!                   OakWant to be a superhero? It’s easy and no cape required, just adopt a black kitten! Black cats are often overlooked in shelters but you can’t miss Oak (adoption #T102619). This 5-month-old kitten was recently rescued from Tennessee, and while he may seem small, the love Oak shows for his humans is mighty! This sweet baby can’t wait to plant roots in your heart. A smart adopter will pick up Oak and carry him home before the weekend!   NelsonNelson (adoption #E3610) is a watchful boy waiting patiently for a new beginning. Having traveled all the way from the hurricane region, this 6-month-old Carolina kitten is shyly sitting pretty until his family scoops him up and carries him home this weekend. A quiet home with children 6 and up in age will reassure him that his place in your heart is a safe one. Volunteers and staff can’t wait to waive goodbye to him as he begins life as a beloved member of your family.   SasheWhen senior Sashe (adoption #D45970) needed a second chance at happiness, NSALA came to her aide. This wonderful 12-year-old gal is very friendly, always greeting all new visitors as if she’s known them forever. Sashe makes loving her very easy, so don’t make this glorious lady wait another moment to be back in a loving home where she belongs!   For more information about adopting Ringo, Gizmo, Oak, Nelson and Sashe, please contact DoritS@animalleague.orgAvailable for adoption at Last Hope Animal Rescue:Bounce and DownyIt’s true that sisters Bounce and Downy are named after laundry softeners, which does seem unusual, but truth be told they got their names from having the power to always “soften” the rough times in their special persons’ lives. These gals have been waiting a long time to be noticed. Rescued at 8 weeks old in Bay Shore, these girls are now 6 months old and ready to finally go to their forever home. Bounce and Downy have so much love to give, why not bring one (or both) home with you today?! For information, please contact Last Hope Animal Rescue atlasthopeanimalrescue.org/Available for adoption at Almost Home Animal Rescue:HarryThis handsome young prince is Harry! He is very friendly and simply loves being pet. Harry gives lots of love bites! He is FIV positive (which doesn’t stop him from doing anything at all) and must be the only royal kitty in the house. If you can open your home to this prince charming, contact Almost Home Animal Rescue at almosthomeli.org or call 631-627-3665 for more information.Available for adoption at the Town of Hempstead Animal Shelter:DahliaNot one person can figure out why anyone would just throw sweet Dahlia out of a moving car, but even more curious, why has Dahlia has not been adopted yet? This incredibly sweet gal loves to be outside, whether it be playing in a pool, walking nicely on her leash or playing fetch. Dahlia is quite “treat motivated,” so you can teach her all the cool tricks. She does nicely in playgroups with low-key dogs, but she can also appear nervous and takes a little time to come out of her shell, so she’s recommended to go home with children 15 and older. If you are interested in learning more about adopting Dahlia, please call for more information at 516-785-5220, visit 3320 Beltagh Ave., Wantagh or email  adoption@tohmail.org. You can also check out Adoptable Shelter Buddies Facebook page for additional info facebook.com/adoptableshelterbuddiesAs always, thanks for reading and please remember to always adopt, never shop…pass it on!last_img read more

Letters to the Editor for Thursday, March 7

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first_imgNisky waste deal is far from ‘win-win’The Town Board of Niskayuna recently voted to pass Resolution 2019-52 to enter into a contract to accept liquid organic waste. Getting that waste to the treatment plant will be accomplished by very large tanker trucks traveling the length of Whitmyer Drive, a narrow residential road with a 90-degree turn that dead ends at the plant. Due to the size of these trucks, it’s impossible for them to stay in their own traffic lane, especially when negotiating that curve. Any vehicle traveling in the opposite direction at the same time is put in an extremely dangerous situation, as there is no place to pull over.This isn’t just about “an increase of truck traffic” that nothing can be done about, as Councilman DellaRatta proclaimed at the Town Board meeting. And it’s a far cry from a “win, win, win, win, win all the way across the board.” It is a recipe for disaster.Kathy LongeSchenectady Via Port needs a ShopRite to surviveKmart is gone from the Via Port Mall and you have a huge empty space to put in a ShopRite. I’m saying ShopRite, as we have enough of the other ones around. The mall needs foot traffic. Places are closing. Remember people don’t need a pair of shoes, some jewelry and other non-essentials every day. They need food every day to survive.You would draw customers left and right and create foot traffic to keep the other stores open. You would draw from Princetown, Scotia, Rotterdam, Rotterdam Junction, Duanesburg and Schenectady, just to name a few. It’s really sad to see such a nice mall going downhill so fast. This month, you have Payless, a jewelry store and I heard Victoria’s Secret might be going out of business. You must do something to get foot traffic into the mall to keep the stores that are left open. Do something before it’s totally empty.Dayton SkellySchenectadyMore from The Daily Gazette:EDITORIAL: Urgent: Today is the last day to complete the censusGov. Andrew Cuomo’s press conference for Sunday, Oct. 18EDITORIAL: Beware of voter intimidationFoss: Should main downtown branch of the Schenectady County Public Library reopen?Cuomo calls for clarity on administering vaccine Trump’s tariff policy comes at local costBased on recent news reports, It appears that the city of Amsterdam will be forced to repay $62,000 to the federal government due to a Trump administration executive order mandating that American-made steel be used for federally financed projects.The “project” in question is the repair of a breakage in Amsterdam’s sewer system, which was necessary to stem the continued flow of millions of gallons of raw sewage into the Mohawk River. Due to the emergency nature of the repair, the steel used for repairs was non-American. Not by choice, but for expediency.Clearly, Donald Trump is a proponent of protectionism in general and tariffs in particular. On July 24, 2018, he tweeted: “Tariffs are the greatest. Remember, we are the piggy bank that’s being robbed.” And, on Nov. 27, 2018: “Billions of dollars are pouring into the coffers of the USA because of tariffs being charged to China.”So, my question is: Who is being robbed now? Seems to me, it’s the “piggy bank” belonging to the citizens of Amsterdam, not China. But, hey, not to worry. In case you’ve forgotten, according to Donald Trump, Mexico is going to pay for a wall at our southern border, not American taxpayers. Perhaps the citizens of Amsterdam should withhold sending the $62,000 to the federal government until Mexico’s wall payments arrive.Paul DeierleinSchenectady A vestigial organ is one which, at present, we can see no useful function for. Such an organ in the human body is, supposedly, the appendix. However, this term now can apply to our favorite toy, the automobile.The organ on the auto is that lever on the left-hand side of the steering wheel. This lever can move up and down. This last part, this up-and-down movement, I believe is becoming a vestigial organ. As described above, if you move this lever up, usually some lights on the right side of the car will blink, in both front and back. Conversely, if the lever is moved down, some lights on the left side of the car both front and back will blink. As it seems now, most of the general public through disuse has forgotten what this lever is for and have discontinued the use of it altogether. Stand at any location and count how many cars use this feature and you will be surprised if the count is as high as 20 percent. (With roundabouts the percentage can get as low as 5 percent.)  Consider changing  to private schoolsParents have the right to choose the education path that best fits their children’s needs. As a parent of small children, I’m concerned about the messages my children receive from society and from our public schools.I’m concerned about my children’s self-esteem when our nation has extremely high suicide rates among the young. I wonder if the teachers who forced students to rate their ethnicity and attractiveness on “white privilege” score sheets cared about the feelings of their students or did they care about pushing their political agenda? Personally, I have to step back from our culture and from our public schools that push kids into an environment that’s too fast, too much, and too negative. I’m choosing a private school that allows kids to be kids. For my family, St. Mary’s School in Ballston Spa is the smaller, kinder and gentler alternative to public school.I would encourage all parents who feel internally conflicted about public school to pay attention to their inner voice. A private school is a financial investment, but schools like ours work with parents to ease financial burdens by offering scholarships and tuition assistance. It’s worth looking into. When I see my children go to school in the morning with smiles on their faces and return home with those same smiles, I feel I made the right choice. Jennifer VanDeCarrBallston Lake Let’s take a look at some of Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s spending over the past few years:$90 million for a light bulb plant in Syracuse that produced zero jobs; $27 million for the Dream Act; free tuition for undocumented immigrants; $15 million for the Syracuse film hub, which flopped and sold for $1; $13 million in aid to Puerto Rico; $10 million for illegal “I Love NY” highway signs; and, $6 million for lights for the opening of the Kosciuszko bridge. The list goes on and on.The governor has been asked to include money in this year’s budget for the St. Clare’s pension fund, which was found to be grossly underfunded. The hospital had been unable to fund the plan because it chose to take care of New Yorkers who could not pay for their health care. The state forced the closure of the hospital and in 2008 it surrendered its operating license. New York state promised to fund the pension as part of the agreement, but it turns out that the money it contributed was not sufficient to fully fund it.If the governor can spend tax money on ridiculous projects, undocumented immigrants and people outside of the state, he certainly should be willing to help the dedicated state health care workers who are losing part or all of their pensions through no fault of their own. Do the right thing, Gov. Cuomo.Bob BradleyClifton Park Cuomo must get his priorities straight Turn signals are obsolete for some What’s missing from GOP silence?Tell me what I’m missing, please. Former Vice President Joe Biden said that Vice President Mike Pence was “a decent guy” and got immediate, strong, as well as understandable push back from Cynthia Nixon and many other Democrats. At CPAC, the president of the United States asserted that there are members of the U.S. Congress who “hate America,” and no Republican even raises an eyebrow.  Denis BrennanNiskayuna Just like the human body, if you don’t use it, you’ll lose it. Car makers, in the attempt to lighten cars for better gas mileage and to get rid of extraneous items that are not utilized, are taking note of this lack of use. Bob NicolellaGlenville Categories: Letters to the Editor, OpinionVictims of revenge porn bear blame tooWhat does it say about our society if there is a call for legislation regarding the dissemination of intimate images? If someone feels they would be embarrassed or victimized by such actions, common sense dictates that they should not knowingly allow such images to exist. In other words, insist that cameras and video devices be kept out of the bedroom. If you value your privacy, you will not participate in the compromising of that privacy. How can one argue that they do not share the responsibility for the existence of such materials and shouldn’t have to suffer the consequences if it is released? Our legislature and law enforcement have better things to do than deal with this issue.Marc DuquetteGlenvillelast_img read more

The numbers don’t add up

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first_imgWould you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletters To access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week.last_img

Government targets sensitive cuts in severance pay in new bill

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first_imgIndonesia plans to loosen rigid rules on mandatory severance compensation in a new bill aimed at improving the investment climate in Southeast Asia’s biggest economy, an official and a source with knowledge of the issue said.Labor laws are politically sensitive and in order to make the changes more palatable to unions the government will also make companies pay some benefits upfront, they said.The proposals are included in so-called “omnibus” bills that President Joko “Jokowi” Widodo has prioritized in his efforts to cut red tape and create jobs. The bills club together changes in unrelated legislation to allow parliament voting in a single swoop to speed reforms. To appease workers, the government will also make companies pay between one to five times monthly salary to staff with at least one year of employment, he said.The payment, which will be capped at Rp 100 million (US$7,300), should be made within a year after the bill is passed, said the source, who declined to be named due to the sensitivity of the issue.Susiwijono Moegiarso, secretary general of the coordinating ministry of economics, confirmed severance benefits would be trimmed and a cash “sweetener” provided, but declined to provide more detail.“This is like a herbal drink, it’s bitter to swallow but it’s healthy,” Moegiarso told Reuters.Government officials have previously said state social security agency BPJS Ketenagakerjaan will also take over some responsibility to provide a safety net for workers out of jobs.Under the proposed new bill, BPJS will provide six months of cash benefits, skills training and access to new jobs, they said.Despite few details of the bill leaking out, unions have already held protests and threatened to stage strikes over concerns about losing job protection and benefits.The final draft of the bill has more than 1,200 articles, revising 80 existing laws, Moegiarso said.A proposal to remove nearly all limits on foreign investment in most business sectors is also included in the bill, said the source.Indonesia’s chief economics minister, Airlangga Hartarto, previously said the government planned to bar foreign ownership from only six sectors and remove a so-called “Negative Investment List”. Foreign investors often cite regulatory uncertainty, bureaucratic hurdles and strict labor rules among their top concern for investing in Indonesia.Officials have said the “Job Creation” bill will be filed to parliament this week, while a taxation bill was submitted to lawmakers recently.Indonesia’s current rules on severance pay are among the most generous in the world and business say they deter formal hiring due to the expense of sacking underperforming employees.The new bill aims to cut maximum severance payments to 19 times monthly salary, down from 32 times now, said the source, who has been involved in drafting the bill.center_img Topics :last_img read more

Gov. Wolf: Opioid Crisis Medical Practitioners Can Now Get Help with Repaying Education Loans

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first_img Education,  Press Release,  Substance Use Disorder Harrisburg, PA – Governor Tom Wolf today announced that the state will allocate $5 million in federal funding to a loan repayment program for health care practitioners providing medical and behavioral health care and treatment for substance use disorder and opioid use disorder in areas with high opioid-use and a shortage of health care practitioners.“It’s imperative that everyone suffering from the disease of addiction is receiving quality care where they can access it, in their communities,” Gov. Wolf said. “By removing some of the burden of debt for medical training, we are incentivizing these professionals to practice where they are most needed.”There are 30 highly impacted counties where opioid use disorder is most prevalent; 15 rural, including Fayette, Lawrence, Blair, Greene, Cambria, Armstrong, Venango, Mercer, Washington, Mifflin, Cameron, Clearfield, Crawford, Indiana and Butler; and 15 urban, including Philadelphia, Westmoreland, Lackawanna, Luzerne, Beaver, Allegheny, Erie, Delaware, Bucks, Dauphin, Berks, York, Lebanon, Lehigh, and Lancaster.While applications are not limited to these counties, practitioners in these counties could receive additional points when being considered for the loan repayment program. Applications are available through June 3.“The opioid crisis is the largest public health crisis in decades, and we continue to need more professionals who can assist in addressing this crisis,” Secretary of Health Dr. Rachel Levine said. “This funding helps us ensure that those affected by the crisis living in both underserved areas and areas hit particularly hard have access to primary medical and behavioral health care services to treat their disorder. We want to make sure that all Pennsylvanians with the disease of addiction have the ability to be treated at a location convenient to them.”The funding comes from the $55.9 million Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMSHA) grant meant to help states increase access to medication-assisted treatment of opioid use disorder, reduce opioid overdose related deaths through prevention, treatment and recovery, and to reduce unmet treatment need.“The Wolf Administration is committed to strengthening the drug and alcohol treatment system throughout all of Pennsylvania,” said Secretary of Drug and Alcohol Programs Jen Smith. “We are at a critical crossroad in the opioid crisis. To date, we have focused on keeping individuals alive by reducing overdose deaths and making naloxone readily available. Now we are starting to shift some of our focus to the quality of treatment individuals receive. A key component to this is ensuring there is an adequate number of doctors available to treat individuals battling substance use disorder. By doing so, we hope to prevent individuals from cycling through the treatment system.”Practitioners are required to have already served two years treating substance use disorder and opioid addiction. Applicants are obligated to commit to providing services for at least two additional years at a substance use disorder approved site: a licensed drug and alcohol treatment facility, a community-based primary care or behavioral health center, a PA State Correctional Institution or a U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs facility in Pennsylvania. Recipients may be from a number of disciplines. More information is available on the Department of Health’s Substance Use Disorder Loan Repayment Program website.This SAMSHA funding complements the state’s existing loan repayment program, which is for primary care physicians. For fiscal year 2018-19, the state’s budget allocated $2.6 million for the Pennsylvania Primary Care Loan Repayment Program through a combination of state and federal funds.For more information about the loan repayment program, visit the Department of Health website at www.health.pa.gov or follow us on Facebook and Twitter.For more information on how the Wolf Administration is battling the opioid crisis, visit governor.pa.gov/action-plan-pennsylvania/#FighttheHeroinandOpioidEpidemic. SHARE Email Facebook Twitter Gov. Wolf: Opioid Crisis Medical Practitioners Can Now Get Help with Repaying Education Loanscenter_img May 15, 2019last_img read more

Long road leads to Lawson’s 2nd Virginia Sprint Series win

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first_imgBy Jim Haines NATURAL BRIDGE, Va. (July 26) – It’s been a long road for Brian Lawson after winning a Virginia Sprint Series pavement race early in the season but it all came good again on the red clay at Natural Bridge Speedway. Lawson topped Saturday night’s IMCA Eagle Motorsports RaceSaver Sprint Car main event with a strong dash to the checkers that carried him across the stripe in front of Ryan Price. Chris Ware and Eliah Omwake paced the field to green with Omwake up high and wide open. The high line was working for him as he streaked away. Glenn Worrell made a move on Ware and took off after Omwake as the non-stop feature clicked away.Omwake was flying while Worrell had to deal with Ryan Price and Lawson. Lawson got to second and was reeling in Omwake after midway. Traffic was helping Lawson as his car was better down low and he swept into the lead with six to go. Price was also looking smooth as he got by Omwake for second.Price tried everything to close in but it was Lawson’s night as he flashed under the checkered flag with a few car lengths to spare. Feature results – 1. Brian Lawson; 2. Ryan Price; 3. Eliah Omwake; 4. Anthony Linkenhoker; 5. Jerald Harris; 6. Tom Humphries; 7. Glenn Worrell; 8. French Grimes; 9. Troy Severin; 10. Chris Ware; 11. Carl Simmons; 12. Charlie Ware; 13. Kevin Fletcher; 14. J.D. Coats; 15. Micheal Keeton.last_img read more

Pampers Develops “Smart Diaper” with Sensors

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first_imgPampers has a new Smart Diaper that will sense when you’re baby is wet and send an alert to your phone!The technology is an alternative to pulling back a baby’s diaper to see if it’s wet.The company calls its smart diaper “Lumi” by Pampers. The diaper has a sensor that sends information to a mobile app.Pampers says the sensor also will track the baby’s sleeping patterns.The new line comes with a baby monitor and a ten-day supply of diapers.There’s no word yet on how much smart diapers will cost.Huggies developed the “Tweet Pee” sensor diaper years ago that had a blue bird sensor that could detect moisture and would tweet waking up the baby.last_img read more

DENCO Chairs Edo FA Awards Nite

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first_imgAs preparation for this year’s edition of Edo State Football Association Awards Nite enters top gear, the organisers of the awards have announced the appointment of Hon Dennis Idahosa popularly (a.k.a DENCO) as the chairman of the awards ceremony.The Organising Committee Chairman, Percy Okogie, who made the announcement in Benin on Monday, said the appointment of Hon Idahosa is in recognition of his personality as a man of honour and high calibre.“We’re excited to have him as the chairman of the occasion. His coming on board is a cheerful news to all of us because we all know the type of personality he’s bringing to the table. “Mr Idahosa, aside being a philanthropist of note, he is also a great youth mobiliser and well-respected by all in and outside the state.”On his part, Mr Idahosa expressed appreciation to the Edo Football Association and the awards committee for finding him worthy to “chair this all-important event.”He added “to me, this is a great honour by a big and respected body like the Edo Football Association. I have known Frank Ilaboya for a while now and he cuts a picture of a very serious, focused and creative person.“I am proud of his achievements within a very short time; I think people like us should rally round to support him to bring back football to the height Edo State is known for.”The Edo FA Awards Nite was initiated by the present FA board led by ace sport journalist, Frank Ilaboya, last year and its purpose is to reward those involved in the football development of the state.This year’s edition comes up on Saturday, December 17, 2016 in Benin City.Share this:FacebookRedditTwitterPrintPinterestEmailWhatsAppSkypeLinkedInTumblrPocketTelegramlast_img read more

Students say NFL team not to impact USC

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first_imgMost students said the construction of an NFL stadium in Downtown Los Angeles would not affect the USC fanbase, now that the state has taken considerable steps to allow its construction.Gov. Jerry Brown helped facilitate the creation of a new NFL stadium in Los Angeles on Tuesday by signing a bill that would limit lawsuits that could delay the creation of the stadium.The proposed stadium would be located adjacent to the Los Angeles Convention Center, 2.3 miles away from the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum.Because of the proposed NFL stadium’s proximity to the Coliseum, some students are worried the proposed stadium will affect traffic in Los Angeles.“[After the creation of a new NFL stadium], the traffic situation at USC and in the Los Angeles area could go from bad to worse,” said Brynne Terry, a freshman majoring in kinesiology. “And because of [its] proximity to campus, traffic could spill over to USC’s campus, which would be an annoyance for all students.”Some students are worried whether people would chose to attend either a USC football game or an NFL football game, but not both, because they wouldn’t want to pay for multiple tickets.Kelly Clark, however, a graduate student studying occupational therapy, does not believe this will be the case given USC’s strong fan base.“USC students and alumni are very committed to their team,” Clark said. “[Students] wouldn’t choose to go to an NFL game over one at their school, simply because of the atmosphere at USC.”Other students agree that a new NFL stadium would not affect the USC fan base because of the deals USC students receive on football tickets.“Trojans are die-hard fans, and they won’t stop coming to [football] games, regardless,” said Jennica Hill, a senior majoring in theater. “Plus, the prices [for NFL games] would be much worse than [USC football ticket prices], because of the great deals we get on season tickets.”If the planned stadium withstands legal issues, construction is likely to begin in June and will finish in 2016, with production costs in the hundreds of millions, according to the Los Angeles Times.last_img read more