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first_img28 September 2012The quest by Team Bonitas, one of South Africa’s most successful professional men’s road cycling teams, to become a world-class outfit has received a major boost, with Bonitas announcing a partnership with French professional team La Pomme Marseille for 2013.The partnership, announced on Friday, between the two International Cycling Union (UCI) Continental-graded teams, will pave the way for members of Team Bonitas, which comprises only South African riders, to compete in some of the highest-level races in France and elsewhere in Europe in 2013.After the team dominated the domestic racing scene from 2009 to 2011, ambitious Team Bonitas owner Malcolm Lange, of Lange Sports, upped the team’s goals to grow into a respected, successful international outfit by registering it as a UCI Continental team for 2012 and added two six-week stints of European racing to the team’s roster.Performed admirablyDuring those stints in Spain and Portugal the team performed admirably. Bonitas then signed former Road General Manager at Cycling South Africa, Barry Austin. Through his relationship with European cycling agents, Velofuture, he attracted the attention of La Pomme Marseille as a possible partner, which has now been finalised.“We know that we have to get our riders to Europe, but we simply don’t have the huge budget to just plant our team there. So creating a partnership with an established club and professional team like La Pomme allows us to aim for the same objectives more cost effectively,” explained Malcolm Lange in a statement.“The French racing scene is a tough one to get into, but by partnering with La Pomme, we’ll have the benefits of the instant infrastructure of a respected community.‘Similar goals and principles“The La Pomme professional team has similar goals and principles to Team Bonitas, so it’ll be an organic growth process for both them and us.“Ultimately, the aim is to springboard talented South Africans into the big leagues and grow the Team Bonitas brand’s reputation both locally and internationally.”There will be a total of four Team Bonitas riders based in Marseille at any one time between April and September 2013 with a rotation system in place to give most of the riders at least a two-month period of racing there each.2013 line-upThe 2013 Team Bonitas team will comprise 10 riders and the final line-up will be announced before the end of November.“South Africa hosts some of the world’s highest profile mountain bike and BMX racing events. The only reason we don’t have consistently high profile road events in the country is because the road cycling event organisers in South Africa cater for the masses with relatively short, less challenging race routes,” said team manager Barry Austin.“This means that our talented road riders have to compete abroad to gain the appropriate experience, which is logistically challenging and costly.“It therefore makes sense to create an association with a team like La Pomme Marseille.“We believe it’s the most efficient way to develop our riders and we will obviously offer reciprocal infrastructure and support when their riders come to South Africa for training camps or to compete in selected events.”SAinfo reporterWould you like to use this article in your publication or on your website? See: Using SAinfo materiallast_img read more

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first_imgParticipants distributed 100 000 litres of water to the community of Borolelo, who are experiencing a severe drought.During Human Rights Month this year, two of the country’s rights are being challenged: the right to access to water and our equality.These very challenges were addressed at Brand South Africa’s Human Rights Month open dialogue in Swartruggens, North West province. Held on Saturday, 12 March, discussions looked at the culture of human rights in South Africa. The underlying theme among all speakers was to take action and help fellow citizens.Discussions took place before participants distributed 100 000 litres of water to the community of Borolelo, who are experiencing a severe drought. Operation Hydrate’s Yaseen Theba said all South Africans should stop criticising each other, the environment and the government for challenges we faced. Instead, we needed to take action to curb these problems.Social advocate Yusuf Abramjee emphasized the need to help each other: “This is exactly what the Play Your Part initiative is about – active citizenry, South Africans using their skills, time and resources to help each other. As citizens we need to see what we can do to tackle some of South Africa’s issues.”Operation Hydrate’s Yaseen Theba said all South Africans should stop criticising each other, the environment and the government for challenges we faced. Instead, we needed to take action to curb these problems.RIDDING SOUTH AFRICA OF RACISMWith President Jacob Zuma declaring 21 March a national day against racism, the issue of racism was brought to the fore in Swartruggens. Speakers stressed the need to unite and build the country.Those who were at the dialogue took the pledge of the Anti-Racism Network South Africa (Arnsa) to eradicate racism. Arnsa is an initiative of the Nelson Mandela Foundation, the Ahmed Kathrada Foundation and 80 other organisations. It is leading many of the events taking place during Anti-Racism Week, which runs from 14 to 21 March, ending on Human Rights Day.Project director of Civics Academy, Lerato Motaung, said society needed to build a country the youth would be proud to inherit. “To do so, we need to change the narrative. At present there is a focus on problems and problem-solving. This needs to shift to a discourse of building.”While discussing the Constitution, Tshegofatso Ramokopeloa, the supervising attorney at North West University’s Community Law Centre, said South Africans needed to practice ubuntu within themselves. “Negativity starts and ends with us, as individuals… We need to use our skills, talents, time and resources to help each other – being selfish takes us away from democracy.”last_img read more

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first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest Hunters checked 188,335 white-tailed deer throughout Ohio’s 2015-2106 deer season, according to the Ohio Department of Natural Resources (ODNR). Last year, 175,745 deer were checked during the 2014-2015 season.To help stabilize deer populations, bag limits were reduced this year, and antlerless permit use was eliminated in most counties. This year’s increase can be attributed to the poor mast crop throughout much of the state, particularly the eastern half where many species of wildlife, including deer, rely heavily on acorns as an important source of food. Other reasons for the increase include the more favorable weather for hunters compared to last year and the earlier harvest of agricultural crops.Deer Management GoalsThe ODNR Division of Wildlife remains committed to properly managing Ohio’s deer populations. The goal of Ohio’s Deer Management Program is to provide a deer population that maximizes recreational opportunities, while minimizing conflicts with landowners and motorists.Until recently, deer populations in nearly all of Ohio’s counties were well above goal. In the last few years, through increased antlerless harvests, most counties are now at or near goal.The ODNR Division of Wildlife is in the process of revising Ohio’s population goals and is asking hunters who received the survey to help by completing and returning their surveys as soon as possible. Hunters for this year’s survey were randomly selected from list of those who purchased a license and deer permit by Nov. 16. Landowner surveys have already been completed, and hunter surveys were mailed early in December. Public input is an important part of Ohio’s deer management program, and survey participants are asked to complete and return their surveys to ensure that hunters have a clear voice in helping to decide the direction of deer management in Ohio.Hunting PopularityHunting is the best and most effective management tool for maintaining Ohio’s healthy deer population. Ohio ranks fifth nationally in resident hunters and 11th in the number of jobs associated with hunting-related industries. Hunting has a more than $853 million economic impact in Ohio through the sale of equipment, fuel, food, lodging and more, according to the National Shooting Sports Foundation’s Hunting in America: An Economic Force for Conservation publication.Find more information about deer hunting at wildohio.gov.last_img read more